Defense Date

11-27-2007

Graduation Date

2007

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

thesis

Degree Name

MS

Department

Chemistry and Biochemistry

School

Bayer School of Natural and Environmental Sciences

Committee Chair

Mihaila Rita Mihailescu

Committee Member

Tomislav Pintauer

Committee Member

Ellen Gawalt

Keywords

monolayers, stainless steel, cell adhesion, oligo (ethylene glycol)

Abstract

The implantation of SS316L stento in an artery is associated with a number of problems, including restenosis and thrombosis, due to non-specific protein and cell attachment to the biomaterial. One way to reduce non-specific attachment is to alter the interfacial properties of these materials. This may be done using self-assembled monolayers. Model gold surfaces have been extensively studied and oligo (ethylene glycol) monolayers are the standard for protein and cell mitigation. In this study, self-assembled monolayers were formed on the native oxide surface of stainless steel 316L using synthesized and commercially available phosphonic and carboxylic acids terminated with methyl and triethylene glycol moieties to investigate their ability to mitigate non-specific attachment of 3T3 Swiss fibroblast cells over a twenty four hour time period. Results indicate that methyl-terminated phosphonic acids provided the greatest mitigation of cells which is analogous to two studies on model gold substrates but not to most studies comparing the two modifications.

Format

PDF

Language

English

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