Defense Date

11-13-2014

Graduation Date

Fall 2014

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

dissertation

Degree Name

PhD

Department

Chemistry and Biochemistry

School

Bayer School of Natural and Environmental Sciences

Committee Chair

Mitchell Johnson, Partha Basu

Committee Member

Michael Cascio

Committee Member

Bruce Beaver

Committee Member

David Gallaher

Keywords

FQ, HPLC, laser induced fluorescence, LIF, microfluidics, NDA

Abstract

In the study of lipids, or "lipidomics," methods for the separation and identification of specific trace compounds are highly sought. Microdroplet techniques have allowed for the ability to handle and detect these trace amounts. The use of low volumes allows for a decrease of the effective mean free path allowing chemical reactions to be carried out efficiently at lower concentrations by performing the reactions in microdroplets as opposed to bulk containers. Microdroplets created on microfluidic devices as segmented flow plugs have the advantage of efficient mixing and minimal dilution or dispersion relative to other nanoliter scale capillary reaction methods. The most sensitive detection techniques are needed for ultratrace analyses. Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) is the most attractive choice for ultratrace analysis. We show two methods for the derivatization and detection of primary amines with 3-(2-furoyl)quinoline-2-carboxaldehyde (FQCA) and with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde (NDA). The method has shown to be successful down to the sub-picomolar level in bulk solutions using an HPLC coupled with a fluorescence detector. The method has been transferred to microfluidic chips to explore the reaction and detection limits of the derivatized amines. Laser induced fluorescence (LIF) by a solid state blue violet laser was used as the detection method for the microfluidic platform. Successful usage of this methodology would allow for ultratrace detection of bioactive amines from small samples.

Format

PDF

Language

English

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