Defense Date

3-22-2006

Graduation Date

2006

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

thesis

Degree Name

MA

Department

History

School

McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts

Committee Chair

Joseph Rishel

Committee Member

Perry Blatz

Keywords

New Left Radicalism

Abstract

New Left radicalism played a vital role within both the city of Ann Arbor and the University of Michigan throughout much of the 1960s and early 1970s. Three organizations, VOICE, the Black Action Movement (BAM), and the Human Rights Party (HRP), particularly allowed for student activism to become an integral part of the politcal, cultural, and social aspects within Ann Arbor. The emergence of these organizations made a once, conservative, Midwestern college town into a hotbed of radicalism that would help create a thriving New Left conglomerate in the city from 1965-1975.

VOICE, one of the leading Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) affiliates, helped create a thriving student radical base, largely by protesting U-M polices over releasing student names to draft boards and governmental committees. Largely inspired by VOICE, BAM, a predominately Black student movement, carried on a three-week to protest what the organization deemed as a discriminatory admissions policy by the university by 1970. By the early 1970s, HRP emerged on the local political scene creating a viable third party in the local arena.

Format

PDF

Language

English

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