Defense Date

4-29-2004

Graduation Date

2004

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

dissertation

Degree Name

EdD

Department

Counselor Education and Supervision (ExCES)

School

School of Education

Committee Chair

Joseph F. Maola

Committee Member

Nicholas J. Hanna

Committee Member

Robert Wilson

Keywords

achievement, middle school, student leadership

Abstract

The evolution of the middle school concept, according to Forte and Schurr (2003), with its own identity and its subsequent implementation, has proven to be an ideal or preferred model for educating students. Knowles and Brown (2000) assert the importance of middle level teachers' ability to nurture their students' academic, emotional, personal, and social development during the often "chaotic" years of transescence and early adolescence.

This study examined and explored sixty-four randomly selected seventh grade middle school students' earned scores on their annual standardized achievement testing, particularly the Terra Nova II Multiple Assessments subtests in the areas of Language, Mathematics, and Reading. The investigator wanted to determine if demonstrating and applying leadership abilities, competencies, qualities, skills, and traits positively influenced the seventh grade middle school students' earned achievement? Additionally, regardless of the seventh grade middle school students' intelligence quotient (IQ), did their demonstrating leadership abilities, competencies, qualities, skills, and traits positively influence their earned scores on the annual standardized achievement testing, particularly the Terra Nova II Multiple Assessments subtests in the areas of Language, Mathematics, and Reading?

The statistical analyses included an analysis of variance (ANOVA), specifically a T test; in addition, an F test was subsequently calculated to determine any significant interactions.

The findings of this study were explored and discussed from Freed and Parsons (1997) view of the "left-right brain continuum," as two of the three main effect hypotheses were rejected. As a result, the findings yielded a significant difference in student leaders and non-student leaders' earned achievement test scores on the subtests of Language and Reading on the Terra Nova II Multiple Assessments. This investigator suggests that the "left-right brain continuum" theory is a potential, valid, and research-supported variable in this study, as it elucidates students' learning styles. Moreover, it is widely stated and commonly known that learning styles ultimately effect students' achievement and earned scores on both standardized testing and authentic assessments.

Finally, the results of this study can assist professional guidance counselors, as well as school district administrators and faculty who are considering implementation and germination of such student leadership programs in their middle school curriculum.

Format

PDF

Language

English

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