Author

Joseph Snoke

Defense Date

6-18-2007

Graduation Date

2007

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

dissertation

Degree Name

EdD

Department

Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program for Education Leaders (IDPEL)

School

School of Education

Committee Chair

Peggy E. Hockersmith

Committee Member

Richard Hupper

Committee Member

Robert B. Bartos

Keywords

Looping, Multi-Year

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to determine if there are increased benefits in a looping instructional delivery system, as it pertains to academic progress, retention rates, and special education placements. Specifically, the study determined if there was a significant difference between students involved in a looping instructional model as compared to those not participating in a looping model. The target population of this study consisted of students looping and non-looping in third, fifth, and eighth grades, who attended rural elementary schools located in central Pennsylvania. The students would have attended the districts between the years of 1999-2005. PSSA scaled scores in Math and Reading were analyzed for the fifth and eighth grade years. Gender, socio-economic background, retention rates, and special education placements were analyzed as factors, which may have been affected by the looping program. One hundred twenty students were selected from both looping and non-looping programs for participation in the study. Academic progress (math and reading) of students, who participated in looping or non-looping instructional model, was measured through a causal-comparative regression analysis. . Results of this study have indicated that there is no statistical significant academic difference between students who participated in either a looping or non-looping educational design.

Format

PDF

Language

English

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