Author

Chad Snyder

Defense Date

9-1-2006

Graduation Date

2006

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

dissertation

Degree Name

PhD

Department

Counselor Education and Supervision (ExCES)

School

School of Education

Committee Chair

Rick A. Myer

Committee Member

Jim Schreiber

Committee Member

William J. Casile

Keywords

Crisis, Crisis Training, Least Restrictive Interventions, Mental Health, Residential Treatment Facility, Restraints, Self-Efficacy, Self-Efficacy Assessment, Semantic Differential Design, Staff Training

Abstract

The differences between residential treatment facility staffs' self-efficacy levels post-crisis assessment training are investigated in order to identify alternative means to restraints as the primary crisis intervention strategy. In order to assess the participants' level of self-efficacy to deal with crises, the self-efficacy assessment tool for crisis (SEAT-C) was developed utilizing a semantic differential design. Through pilot testing, the SEAT-C was determined to be a reliable and valid instrument. Training in the Triage Assessment Model for crisis intervention was provided to 79 residential treatment facility staff employed at a child and adolescent residential treatment facility in the southwestern part of a Mid-Atlantic state. Following the training, participants completed the SEAT-C and the results of the experimental and control groups' level of self efficacy are compared across the four crisis concepts: crisis as danger, crisis as opportunity, crisis as assessment and crisis as intervention. The four crisis concepts are examined across the three timeframes of pre-crisis, crisis and post-crisis. The results indicate that significantly statistical differences exist within the sub-hypotheses of the concepts: pre-crisis as assessment, pre-crisis as opportunity, crisis as danger and crisis as assessment.

Format

PDF

Language

English

Share

COinS