Defense Date

7-8-2014

Graduation Date

2014

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

thesis

Degree Name

MA

Department

Graduate Center for Social and Public Policy

School

McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts

Committee Chair

Douglas Harper

Committee Member

Evan Stoddard

Keywords

Food insecurity, Food security, Neighborhood, North Side, Pittsburgh, Poverty

Abstract

Semi-structured interviews with three householders and three community food program managers were conducted to explore if food assistance programs meet the needs of residents in Pittsburgh's North Side neighborhoods. Findings show that insufficient income is the main factor contributing to household food insecurity. North Side residents also have difficulty obtaining nutritious and affordable foods because fresh produce is often too expensive and supermarket food quality is considered low. Farm stands and other food access programs are well received, but only provide access to nutritious foods during the summer. Limited income and limited food access increase reliance on food pantries and Produce to People. Householders use multiple programs to meet their food needs. Householders appreciate the food programs and seem satisfied; however, responses suggest some needs are unfulfilled and householders face monotonous diets. This may not be apparent to providers because householders may mask dissatisfaction to avoid appearing unappreciative. North Side food assistance programs provide sufficient food and usually complementary food to residents, but there appears to be a lack of variety in household diets and seasonal access to fresh and nutritious foods.

Format

PDF

Language

English

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