Defense Date

11-17-2004

Graduation Date

2004

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

thesis

Degree Name

MA

Department

Graduate Center for Social and Public Policy

School

McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts

Committee Chair

Joseph D. Yenerall

Committee Member

Clifford Bob

Committee Member

Richard A. Colignon

Keywords

democracy, sub-Saharan Africa

Abstract

The study utilizes the multivariate regression techniques to investigate the role of political behavior; power structure (at the micro level) and socio economic development (macro level) in the transition and consolidation of democracy in Sub Saharan Africa. In the analysis, political behavior, defined as the acceptance of political elites to accommodate divergent views, is the most significant predictor of democracy in the region. Socio economic development is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the consolidation of democracy in the region. In conclusion, I argue that Sub Saharan African nations must pursue both political and economic liberalization which entails the creation of a business elite that is separate from the political elites in order to consolidate the democratic gains achieved in the past decade.

Format

PDF

Language

English

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