Author

Tia Wanzo

Defense Date

8-18-2014

Graduation Date

2014

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

dissertation

Degree Name

EdD

Department

Professional Doctorate in Educational Leadership (ProDEL)

School

School of Education

Committee Chair

Gretchen Generett

Committee Member

Rula Skezas

Committee Member

Rick McCown

Abstract

A pertinent educational issue in our country is the black and white achievement gap. One specific program that has been developed and implemented over the last several years in an effort to provide strong academic curriculum and raise student achievement, including minority student achievement, is the College Board's advanced placement (AP) Program. The AP Program courses are widely recognized as providing students with academically challenging curriculum, facilitating their acceptance to colleges and supporting their preparation for post-secondary education. The emphasis of this work relates to the concern that although the AP program has been in existence for decades and is a key part of most high schools' curriculum, there is an underrepresentation of Black students in Advanced Placement classes.

This work takes a brief look at the achievement gap and opportunity gap and describes how the common theme of course taking impacts the gaps. It discusses systematic barriers which lead to the inequities in advanced placement classes such as: Socioeconomic Status/Poverty School Structure/Policy, Teacher Training/Teacher Expectations, and Parental Involvement. In addition, it briefly describes the historical journey of intelligence, testing, and social theories. The framework used to address the problem is Networked Improvement Communities. Finally, light is shed on a school district currently working on this problem and a strategic plan is suggested in order to assist other schools, communities, or academies.

Format

PDF

Language

English

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