Author

Megan Weigel

Defense Date

7-1-2013

Graduation Date

2013

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

thesis

Degree Name

MS

Department

Speech-Language Pathology (SLP)

School

Rangos School of Health Sciences

Committee Chair

Gary Rentschler

Committee Member

Heather Rusiewicz

Committee Member

Craig Coleman

Keywords

Adolescents, Stuttering

Abstract

Stuttering is considered a low-incidence communication disorder, but for those who stutter, the symptoms can handicap many aspects of life. Stuttering typically presents early in childhood and data indicates the probability for natural recovery ends near the emergence of adolescence. When stuttering continues into adulthood, it is considered chronic. Currently, there is limited research on which therapy techniques have proven to be most successful with adolescents, a unique population at a pivotal age in therapy. The original intent of this study was to investigate factors that contribute to successful therapy for adolescents who stutter. Due to recruitment limitations, the data presented is considered to be part of a pilot study investigating adolescents' experiences in stuttering therapy. The data includes measure of stuttering impact, experience in stuttering treatment, and success of stuttering treatment. Relationships between the variables were explored. Limitations and implications of these results are discussed from a clinical perspective.

Format

PDF

Language

English

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