Defense Date

8-12-2013

Graduation Date

2013

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

dissertation

Degree Name

PhD

Department

Nursing

School

School of Nursing

Committee Chair

Rick Zoucha

Committee Member

Khlood Salman

Committee Member

Marilyn McFarland

Keywords

Culture Care Theory, Ethnonursing, Immigrants, Mental Health, Psychiatry, Somali

Abstract

The purpose of this qualitative ethnonursing research study was to explore, discover, and understand the mental health meanings, beliefs, and practices from the perspective of immigrant Somalis living in the United States. Leininger's Culture Care Diversity and Universality Theory, ethnonursing method, and ethnonursing enablers were utilized as organizing frameworks for studying the domain of inquiry. Interviews were conducted with 21 general informants and 9 key informants, all of whom were Somali immigrants living in Minnesota. Utilizing the ethnonursing data analysis enabler, analysis of the interviews revealed 21 categories and 9 patterns from which two main themes emerged. The themes were (a) significant influences of religion on health and care and (b) tribe connectedness, cultural history, and khat usage are significant in health care access and treatment. These findings also detailed what Somali immigrants may value, need and expect from health care professionals. Implications and recommendations for practice, education, and research are described.

Format

PDF

Language

English

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