Title

The Neuroethical Case Against Cognitive Memory Manipulation

Defense Date

5-4-2016

Graduation Date

Summer 1-1-2016

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

dissertation

Degree Name

PhD

Department

Health Care Ethics

School

McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts

Committee Chair

Gerard Magill

Committee Member

Gerard Magill

Committee Member

Henk ten Have

Committee Member

Joris Glen

Keywords

Autobiographical Memory, Emotional Rationality, Ethical Decision Making, Narrative Identity, Neurocognitive Memory Manipulation, Neuroethics

Abstract

An increasingly blurred understanding of the moral significance of accurate and authentic memory reconsolidation for an adequate apprehension of self, other, and community suggests a critical need to explore the inter-relationships shared between autobiographical memory, emotional rationality, and narrative identity in light of the contemporary possibilities of neurocognitive memory manipulation, particularly as it bears on ethical decision making. Grounding its thesis in four evidential effects – namely, (i) neurocognitive memory manipulation disintegrates autobiographical memory, (ii) the disintegration of autobiographical memory degenerates emotional rationality, (iii) the degeneration of emotional rationality decays narrative identity, and (iv) the decay of narrative identity disables one to seek, identify, and act on the good – the dissertation argues that neurocognitive memory manipulation cannot be justified as a morally licit biomedical practice insofar as it disables one to seek, identify, and act on the good.

Format

PDF

Language

English

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