Title

Phenomenological Distance in Interpersonal Relationships

Defense Date

11-11-2005

Graduation Date

Fall 1-1-2005

Availability

Campus Only

Submission Type

dissertation

Degree Name

PhD

Department

Communication and Rhetorical Studies

School

McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts

Committee Chair

Janie Harden Fritz

Committee Member

Kathleen Glenister Roberts

Committee Member

Ronald C. Arnett

Keywords

distance, interpersonal relationships, language, phenomenological distance, self-disclosure

Abstract

Phenomenological distance serves as a guiding metaphor for relational development in public and private settings that permits recognition of the contribution of distance to the flourishing of relationships, permitting them to grow at a healthy pace without the pressure of immediate closeness. A stabile and balanced relationship that emerges at its own pace because of commonalities (common ground, joint task) is preferred to one that operates under a pretense of caring (forced intimacy). Phenomenological distance refers to one's experience of relation with others in the world that can be rhetorically constructed through the form of language employed in the content of messages in interpersonal exchanges (e.g., self-disclosure) since language not only represents phenomena in the world but defines the nature of relationships within which discourse takes place.

Format

PDF

Language

English

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS