Title

The Principle of Subsidiarity, Catholic Social Thought, and the Relationship Between Cuba and the United States

Defense Date

12-2-2004

Graduation Date

Spring 1-1-2005

Availability

Campus Only

Submission Type

thesis

Degree Name

PhD

Department

Theology

School

McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts

Committee Chair

James P. Hanigan

Committee Member

Aaron L. Mackler

Committee Member

James Bailey

Committee Member

Sean P. Kealy

Keywords

Cuba, Roman Catholic Church, Social Ethics

Abstract

This dissertation applies key principles of Catholic social thought to the relationship between Cuba and the United States. The relationship between the two neighboring nations has been studied extensively from the perspective of history, economics and political science. A systematic theological investigation offers a different vantage point on this complex relationship. The work utilizes a dialogical approach bringing the history of the relationship between Cuba and the U. S. into conversation with the principles of Catholic social ethics.

Seven principles of Catholic social thought are presented in the historic context of their articulation in papal documents. The thesis argues that the Principle of Subsidiarity is foundational to the other six principles as they apply to the relationship between Cuba and the United States. The other six principles include the Principle of Church and State, the Common Good, Human Rights, the Right to Private Ownership, the Preferential Option for the Poor, and Liberation.

The seven principles are first applied to the political and social context of the Roman Catholic Church in Cuba. Subsequently the principles are applied to the Cuba -- U.S. relationship. With the Principle of Subsidiarity as foundational, it is argued that the restrictive policies of the Cuban government violate these principles and inhibit the full realization of the humanity of the Cuban people. A parallel argument is made that the oppressive strategies of U.S. foreign policy toward Cuba violate these principles and likewise inhibit the full realization of the humanity of the Cuban people. In conclusion, it is argued that a theology of reconciliation is necessary though insufficient in the restoration of normal relations between the two nations and their people.

Format

PDF

Language

English

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