Defense Date

3-31-2020

Graduation Date

Spring 5-8-2020

Availability

One-year Embargo

Submission Type

thesis

Degree Name

MA

Department

History

School

McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts

Committee Chair

Robin P. Chapdelaine

Committee Member

Andrew Simpson

Keywords

Rwanda, Africa, genocide, Hutu, Tutsi, independence, colonial, Belgium, United Nations

Abstract

During the Rwandan genocide, Hutu targeted Tutsi and allies. Interpreting this complex event requires examining the late 1950s. Analyzing Tutsi and Hutu in central Rwanda in 1957 improves understanding of political and social context preceding the genocide. This study rejects that the genocide occurred as an inevitable event. Instead, it layers domestic actors with international groups: the White Fathers missionaries; the United Nations; Belgium; and the United States. Analyzing each group and synthesizing their interactions elevates Rwanda’s history from the falsehood of ancient adversaries to a complex, modern narrative. Studying Rwandan rhetoric and responses to it provides an opportunity to display and study Rwandan agency and identity. This research analyzes sources from Tutsi and the Hutu perspectives, the White Fathers, the UN Visiting Mission, and Belgian reports. It provides a complex understanding of each group’s actions. The study concludes by integrating the 1994 genocide, therefore presenting a nuanced view of identity and group dynamics in this transformative time of Rwandan history.

Language

English

Available for download on Saturday, May 08, 2021

Share

COinS