Defense Date

3-12-2020

Graduation Date

Spring 5-8-2020

Availability

One-year Embargo

Submission Type

dissertation

Degree Name

PhD

Department

Counselor Education and Supervision (ExCES)

School

School of Education

Committee Chair

Matthew Joseph

Committee Member

Jered B. Kolbert

Committee Member

Nicole R. Hill

Keywords

emerging adulthood, cultural identity, identity salience, salience, individuation, life satisfaction

Abstract

This quantitative study examined emerging adults’ (18-29 years old) cultural identity domains of race/ethnicity identity, gender identity, sexual identity, spiritual identity, and socioeconomic class identity with their features of individuation from parents and life satisfaction. Additional emphases were placed on understanding the differences between college-going and non-college-going emerging adults and the differences between early (18-23 years old) and later (24-29 years old) emerging adulthood. This study supported both significant and non-significant relationships among the cultural identity domains salience with the features of individuation and life satisfaction. Emerging adults who attend college were revealed to have higher life satisfaction than those who have never attended college. No differences were found between early emerging adulthood and later emerging adulthood. The findings suggest that emerging adults’ salience in their specific cultural identity domains is related to their life satisfaction and features of their individuation from their parents. Implications of these results for professional counseling practice and the practice of pedagogy are explored. Future directions for research and limitations of the study are also discussed.

Language

English

Available for download on Saturday, May 08, 2021

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