Defense Date

6-29-2020

Graduation Date

Summer 8-8-2020

Availability

One-year Embargo

Submission Type

thesis

Degree Name

MA

Department

Theology

School

McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts

Committee Chair

Daniel P. Scheid

Committee Member

Elizabeth Agnew Cochran

Keywords

leisure, festivity, christianity, society, moral philosophy, aquinas, creation, virtues, philosophy of mind, apophatic theology

Abstract

Josef Pieper’s practical moral philosophy can be best understood by reference to the theology of Thomas Aquinas, and specifically Aquinas’ concept of the created human person. Pieper uses Aquinas’ theological anthropology to argue for three actions which respond to the reality of being created: giving assent to having been brought into existence by God, perceiving God and created reality, and pursuing of the end of human life through the practice of the virtues in order to receive beatitude. Pieper’s well-known works on the seven virtues, on leisure, and on festivity rely on the same concepts from Aquinas which Pieper examines in depth in his works of speculative philosophy. By providing context for each of the selected works, this thesis demonstrates the unity of Pieper’s speculative and practical moral philosophy as well as his conception of the ideal human life in a society which allows both contemplation and divine worship.

Language

English

Additional Citations

Josef Pieper’s practical moral philosophy can be best understood by reference to the theology of Thomas Aquinas, and specifically Aquinas’ concept of the created human person. Pieper uses Aquinas’ theological anthropology to argue for three actions which respond to the reality of being created: giving assent to having been brought into existence by God, perceiving God and created reality, and pursuing of the end of human life through the practice of the virtues in order to receive beatitude.

Pieper’s well-known works on the seven virtues, on leisure, and on festivity rely on the same concepts from Aquinas which Pieper examines in depth in his works of speculative philosophy. By providing context for each of the selected works, this thesis demonstrates the unity of Pieper’s speculative and practical moral philosophy as well as his conception of the ideal human life in a society which allows both contemplation and divine worship.

Available for download on Sunday, August 08, 2021

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