Defense Date

7-28-2020

Graduation Date

Winter 12-18-2020

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

dissertation

Degree Name

PhD

Department

School Psychology

School

School of Education

Committee Chair

Ara J. Schmitt

Committee Member

Kara E. McGoey

Committee Member

Launcelot I. Brown

Keywords

reading, NICU, parental stress, attachment

Abstract

Premature birth and a corresponding hospitalization in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) presents infants and their families with an array of medical and psychosocial stressors that have the potential to impact neurodevelopment and social-emotional functioning in both the long-and short-term. Research has demonstrated the importance of family-integrated, developmental care interventions and a need for supportive environmental and sensory stimulation for the infant to optimize developmental, social, and emotional outcomes. Engaging parents in bedside care that fosters sensory development, supports cognitive and language skills, and lays a strong foundation for bonding and attachment can be monumental for the dyad. Implementation of a NICU-based mother-infant bedside reading intervention has a variety of potential benefits for both the mother and the infant, specifically in relation to supporting the growing maternal-infant attachment relationship and alleviating some degree of maternal stress from the NICU environment.

Language

English

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