Defense Date

7-11-2010

Graduation Date

2010

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

thesis

Degree Name

MA

Department

English

School

McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts

Committee Chair

Bernard Beranek

Committee Member

Anne Brannen

Keywords

apocalypse, inferno, prophecy, revelation, solitude

Abstract

The literary genre apocalypse is unknown or, at best, vague to literary scholarship. The genre apocalypse is an important category of religious and world literature. Apocalypses communicate diverse worldviews. They rationalize existence. They encourage audiences unto righteousness and warn audiences of sin. Their common forms and functions achieve their distinctive, visionary, revelatory quality and exhortative force. These forms and functions constitute the genre apocalypses' definition, and differentiate apocalypses from other works. Dante's Inferno and Gabriel García Márquez's One Hundred Years of Solitude are both apocalypses, though they are not normally considered such. Each work manifests an apocalypse's typical form and function. Each presents a unique vision of reality. Each exhorts consistently with it vision, aims its exhortation at its unique audience and era, and achieves all this through typically apocalyptic motifs like those seen in Revelation. Inferno and Solitude's apocalypticism reveals their meaning and explains their cultural effect.

Format

PDF

Language

English

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