Defense Date

5-6-2009

Graduation Date

2009

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

dissertation

Degree Name

PhD

Department

Nursing

School

School of Nursing

Committee Chair

Rick Zoucha

Committee Member

Shirley Smith

Committee Member

Jok Madut Jok

Keywords

Sudan, refugee, health care beliefs, well-being, culture, care

Abstract

The purpose of this ethnonursing study was to describe, analyze and interpret the culture care beliefs, meanings and practices related to health and well-being of South Sudanese "Lost Boy and Lost Girls" following resettlement in the United States. Leininger's theory of culture care diversity and universality and the ethnonursing method provided the organizing framework for studying the domain of inquiry. Interviews were conducted with nineteen general informants and ten key informants, all who lived in the Midwest United States. Extensive analysis of digitally recorded interviews together with the researcher's participant observations and field notes revealed nine data categories and five patterns from which three main themes emerged. The themes were (a) spiritual care, grounded in a belief in the strength and wisdom of one God, is health promoting and illness preventing; (b) contributing to and meeting the expectations of the community are necessary for health and well-being; and (c) the conflicting expectations of two cultures are affecting health and well-being. The findings of this study provide a framework from which to develop culturally congruent care for the "Lost Boys and Girls." Implications and recommendations for nursing theory, practice, education, and research are offered.

Format

PDF

Language

English

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