Author

Brian Goercke

Defense Date

6-3-2004

Graduation Date

2004

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

thesis

Degree Name

MA

Department

Graduate Center for Social and Public Policy

School

McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts

Committee Chair

Daniel Lieberfeld

Committee Member

Joseph D. Yenerall

Keywords

African Culture, HIV/AIDS, Shona Culture, Traditional Beliefs, Traditional Healers, Zimbabwe

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between secondary students in the rural and peri-urban areas of Mashonaland in Zimbabwe and their tendencies to agree or disagree with traditional Shona attitudes, beliefs and practices as they related to the HIV/AIDS pandemic. A convenience, cluster sample was used to identify the 482 students who participated in this study. A questionnaire composed of demographics, hypothetical and open-ended questions was administered to these students within the regular classrooms of their respective schools.

A notable finding in this study was that traditional Shona beliefs appear to be stronger in the rural areas. However, the students surveyed gave no indication that these beliefs limited their understandings of the cause of HIV/AIDS and the consequences of unprotected sex. The data from study contravene my hypothesis that rural students have more difficulties in understanding the true nature of this disease because of their reliance upon traditional Shona traditions.

Format

PDF

Language

English

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