Author

Joshua Laufer

Defense Date

3-14-2011

Graduation Date

2011

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

thesis

Degree Name

MA

Department

Graduate Center for Social and Public Policy

School

McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts

Committee Chair

Kent Moors

Committee Member

John Sawicki

Keywords

Bush administration, CIA, Enhanced Interrogation, Geneva Conventions, Guantanamo Bay and Abu Ghraib, War on Terror

Abstract

The outcry of torture being used during CIA interrogations of enemy combatants at Guantanamo Bay and other sites certainly jolted international humanitarians. With modern warfare evolving towards unconventional warfare, the notion of interrogation has become more controversial and linked hand-in-hand with torture methods. This study is not trying to make a case for torture, but instead seeks to provide qualitative reasoning through primary and secondary sources which some seek to support enhanced interrogation.

It will be important to identify why enhanced interrogation techniques are effective and deemed essential by some. If certain enhanced methods create extreme physical and emotional duress, then they will be considered methods of torture and inappropriate to employ to extract intelligence from combatants. This study expects to find that there is a tautological connection between counterterrorism and the interrogation methods. Although positive international law permits the use of certain techniques, there is an ever-growing negative opinion of all borderline methods throughout the international community.

Format

PDF

Language

English

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