Defense Date

3-20-2006

Graduation Date

2006

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

thesis

Degree Name

MA

Department

Graduate Center for Social and Public Policy

School

McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts

Committee Chair

Daniel Lieberfeld

Committee Member

Douglas Harper

Keywords

Alaska, American Indian, Collective Identity, Land Rights, Political Process Model

Abstract

The emergence and success of the Alaskan Native Land Rights Movement of the period between 1959 and 1971 is analyzed based on the political process model and other theories from the social movement theory perspective. Explanations outside of the political process model, including resource mobilization theory, ethnic competition theory, collective identity theory, and grievance theory were used to assess the applicability of the political process model in this case study. Interviews were used as well as historical literature and theoretical literature as a basis of analysis.

The findings suggest that the political process model is not sufficient in explaining the emergence and success of the ANLRM. The other theories discussed above were found to be involved in the emergence and success of the Alaskan Native Land Rights Movement, along with the political process model.

Format

PDF

Language

English

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