Defense Date

11-27-2007

Graduation Date

2007

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

dissertation

Degree Name

EdD

Department

Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program for Education Leaders (IDPEL)

School

School of Education

Committee Chair

Wil Barber

Committee Member

Gibbs Y. Kanyongo

Committee Member

Maureen Ungarean

Keywords

middle schools, teacher evaluation

Abstract

With the emergence of the Pennsylvania Academic Standards in 1998, and the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, greater emphasis has been placed on teacher accountability. As part of this reform, teacher evaluation has been an item of particular importance. Research demonstrates that teacher evaluation has been prevalent since the colonial times; however, evaluation systems differ and lack consistency.

The purpose of this study was to understand the relationship between Teachers' Attitudes Toward Teacher Evaluation In High and Low Achieving Middle Schools Based on the Pennsylvania State System of Assessment. Several educational researchers (Darling-Hammond, 1986; Weber, 1987: Frels, Cooper and Reagan, 1996) have shown evidence that the effectiveness of teacher evaluation can be significantly enhanced when teachers and principals view similarly the aspects of evaluation.

This study attempted to determine if a link existed between higher PSSA scores and teacher attitudes toward their teacher evaluations. Overall findings of this study offer implications for professional educational practice. This study's data supported the conclusions of the bulk of scholarly literature, which demonstrated that most teacher evaluation systems did not assist teachers to grow professionally (McGreal, 1983; Sergiovani and Starrat, 1988; Shinkfield and Stuffelbeam, 1995).

Format

PDF

Language

English

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