Author

Jenna Lusk

Defense Date

3-31-2011

Graduation Date

2011

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

thesis

Degree Name

MA

Department

History

School

McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts

Committee Chair

Holly A. Mayer

Committee Member

Holly A. Mayer

Committee Member

Perry K. Blatz

Keywords

American Revolution, British military, Guy Johnson, Iroquois, Joseph Brant, Sir. William Johnson

Abstract

The American Revolution was revolutionizing for multiple reasons, and the changes in intercultural relations between the British Army, imperial and provincial leadership, and the Iroquois were some of them. The colonial go-between who had mediated exchanges between these two groups since contact and who could represent multiple parties fairly was destroyed during the American Revolution. Joseph Brant, a Mohawk, and Guy Johnson, the Superintendent of Indian Affairs for the British, were two go-betweens whose powers and roles as mediators were subverted, even extinguished, by the conclusion of the War for Independence. This thesis examines the events that precipitated this fate for Brant and Johnson and changed the future of intercultural mediation with the Iroquois in New York.

Format

PDF

Language

English

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