Author

Erin Lyttle

Defense Date

3-19-2004

Graduation Date

2004

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

thesis

Degree Name

MA

Department

Graduate Center for Social and Public Policy

School

McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts

Committee Chair

Douglas Harper

Committee Member

Sharon Erickson Nepstad

Keywords

charter schools, education policy, No Child Left Behind, public education

Abstract

The charter school movement and the federal legislation No Child Left Behind (2001) have put a process in motion through which parents and students can opt out of the established public education system. This thesis is an in-depth study of one Pittsburgh charter school within the context of a critique of public education in American history. Empirical data was collected through a triangulated research design, which included interviews, surveys, field observations, and content analysis.

Determining the features of a charter school that make classroom dynamics more or less effective than those in traditional public schools was the original micro-level focus of this research. Making policy recommendations for public school districts in relation with No Child Left Behind emerged as the macro-level focus. This dual focus is intended to increase educators' and policymakers' knowledge about school improvement models, especially in large urban systems.

Format

PDF

Language

English

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