Author

Jennifer Mann

Defense Date

11-13-2015

Graduation Date

2015

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

dissertation

Degree Name

EdD

Department

Professional Doctorate in Educational Leadership (ProDEL)

School

School of Education

Committee Chair

Fran Serenka

Committee Member

Gretchen Generette

Committee Member

Gary Shank

Committee Member

Connie Moss

Keywords

marginalization, mattering, resiliency

Abstract

This interactive phenomenological study was an attempt to understand how marginalized, low socioeconomic students in a predominately white suburban school were able to succeed to graduation and beyond. Six students were interviewed using semi-structured questions in an audio-recorded interview while the researcher annotated body language, emotions, and pauses of the participant. The perceptions of the students were examined in relation to Buber's existential I-Thou relational theory as well as other care-oriented educators such as Freire, Dewey, and Nel Noddings. Also informing the conceptual framework of the study were Milstein and others regarding resiliency.

Significant themes emerged from the participants' narratives; however, rather than the expected prevailing theme of resiliency, something unexpected emerged. The participants all discussed the necessity of mattering to someone, of being heard and seen. This prevailing theme is what transformed the lives of these young people and gave them the inner strength to cope with often devastating events in their lives.

Format

PDF

Language

English

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