Author

Daria Meyer

Defense Date

3-19-2004

Graduation Date

2004

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

thesis

Degree Name

MA

Department

Graduate Center for Social and Public Policy

School

McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts

Committee Chair

Richard A. Colignon

Committee Member

Joseph D. Yenerall

Keywords

Native American, tobacco

Abstract

This study examines the relationship between culture, demographics, education, family structure, peer influence, and social isolation and the frequency of tobacco use among Native American adolescents in Montana. Peer influence and family structure were found to be the most influential factors regarding the frequency of tobacco use. Those who do not have close friends that smoke, believe smoking is wrong, do not believe they will smoke as an adult, have parents who believe smoking is wrong, have no older siblings at least not within close age proximity, have higher grades in school, are in a lower grade, and tend to be honest with their parents are less likely to smoke or smoke less frequently. The results suggest a greater need for culturally specific prevention programs to target the needs of minority racial and ethnic groups.

Format

PDF

Language

English

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