Title

Professional quality of life and caring behaviours among clinical nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic

DOI

10.1111/jocn.15937

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

7-6-2021

Publication Title

Journal of clinical nursing

Keywords

COVID-19 pandemic, caring behavior, clinical nurses, professional quality of life

Abstract

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To investigate the professional quality of life and caring behaviours among clinical nurses in Saudi Arabia during the COVID-19 pandemic. We also examined the influence of the nurses' socio-demographic and professional characteristics on the professional quality of life. Moreover, the study examined the influence of professional quality of life on caring behaviour among the nurses amid the COVID-19 pandemic. BACKGROUND: Caring is the core of the nursing profession and considered the heart of the humanistic clinical nursing practice. However, the work nature of the clinical nurses, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic, continues to challenge their professional quality of life and caring behaviours. The factors influencing the professional quality of life and caring behaviours of clinical nurses have not been extensively explored. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, descriptive study. METHODS: A purposive sample of 375 clinical nurses in three academic medical centres in Saudi Arabia were surveyed using the professional quality of life version 5 and the short-form 24-item Caring Behavior Inventory from May-August 2020. A standard multiple regression analysis was performed to investigate the predictors of the professional quality of life and caring behaviour. This study adhered to the recommendations of the Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology guidelines. RESULTS: The majority of the respondents reported average level of compassion satisfaction (57.9%), burnout (54.4%) and secondary traumatic stress (66.9%) in the professional quality of life domains. The result also showed highest degree of caring in terms of 'assurance of human presence' while lowest in the 'knowledge and skills' in four subscales of caring behaviour. The following variables significantly predicted compassion satisfaction: education, area of assignment and position. Age, education and religion were identified as significant predictors of burnout while religion, nationality and position were significant predictors of secondary traumatic stress. Positive and negative domains of professional quality of life influenced the caring behaviours among clinical nurses. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the results of the study, clinical nurses exhibited moderate level of professional quality of life and correlates to their caring behaviours. Moreover, clinical nurses' demographic characteristics predicted their professional quality of life and caring behaviours. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The importance of ensuring good professional quality of life and caring behaviour among clinical nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic is underscored. Nursing leaders can utilise this baseline evidence and apply programmes for clinical nurses to tackle professional quality of life issues and enhance caring behaviours.

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