Title

Reported nutrient intake over 7 years after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-3 (LABS-3) psychosocial study

DOI

10.1016/j.soard.2020.04.007

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

8-1-2020

Publication Title

Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases

Volume

16

Issue

8

First Page

1022

Last Page

1029

ISSN

15507289

Keywords

Bariatric surgery, Dietary reference intakes, Nutrient intake, Recommended dietary allowance, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

Abstract

Background: Bariatric surgery is the most effective therapy for severe obesity. It reduces gastric capacity and may modify regulation of appetite, satiety, insulin, and other physiologic processes, resulting in weight loss. Objective: Long-term data on postsurgical nutrient intake are lacking. Setting: The Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-3 psychosocial study. Methods: Reported dietary intake was assessed in a subset of participants (n = 72) of the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery-3 psychosocial study who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery. Two 24-hour diet recalls at presurgery and annual assessments over 7 years were obtained. Reported diets were evaluated for energy, macro- and micronutrient intake, and assessed for adequacy by comparison to the dietary reference intakes. Results: After surgery, reported intake of total energy, and all macronutrients were significantly reduced. At least a quarter of participants reported protein intake below the recommended dietary allowance. Over half of participants reported intake of several vitamins (C, D, A, E, thiamin, folate) and minerals (zinc, calcium) below recommended levels over 7 years. Compared with presurgery, reported energy intake was reduced over 7 years. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT02495142. Conclusions: The reduction in energy resulted in intakes below the dietary reference intakes for many micronutrients among the majority of participants and below the recommended dietary allowance for protein in a substantial subgroup. These data support continued long-term nutrition education, monitoring, and supplementation.

Open Access

Green Accepted

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