Title

Mental disorders and weight change in a prospective study of bariatric surgery patients: 7 years of follow-up

DOI

10.1016/j.soard.2019.01.008

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

5-1-2019

Publication Title

Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases

Volume

15

Issue

5

First Page

739

Last Page

748

ISSN

15507289

Keywords

Bariatric surgery, Gastric bypass, Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding, Mental disorders, Mood disorders, Quality of life, Weight change

Abstract

Background: Long-term, longitudinal data are limited on mental disorders after bariatric surgery. Objective: To report mental disorders through 7 years postsurgery and examine their relationship with changes in weight and health-related quality of life. Setting: Three U.S. academic medical centers. Method: As a substudy of the Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery Consortium, 199 adults completed the structured clinical interview for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition prior to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) or laparoscopic adjustable gastric band. Participants who completed ?1 follow-up through 7 years postsurgery are included (n = 173; 86.9%). Mixed models were used to examine mental disorders over time, and among the RYGB subgroup (n = 104), their relationship with long-term (?4 yr) pre- to postsurgery changes in weight and health-related quality of life, measured with the Short Form-36 Health Survey, and with weight regain from nadir. Results: Compared with presurgery (34.7%), the prevalence of having any mental disorder was significantly lower 4 years (21.3%; P < .01) and 5 years (19.2%; P = .01), but not 7 years (29.1%; P = .27) after RYGB. The most common disorders were not related to long-term weight loss postRYGB. However, independent of weight change, mood and anxiety disorders, both pre- and postRYGB, were significantly related to less improvement in mental (but not physical) health-related quality of life. Having a concurrent mood disorder appeared to be associated with greater weight regain (6.4% of maximum weight lost, 95% confidence interval, ?.3 to 13.1), but this was not statistically significant (P = .06). Conclusions: Bariatric surgery does not result in consistent long-term reductions in mental disorders. Mood disorders may impact long-term outcomes of bariatric surgery.

Open Access

Green Accepted

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