Presenter Information

AUTHOR: Etchi, Besem Oben

DEPARTMENT: Theology

Abstract

This paper makes three hermeneutical contributions: (1) By uncovering the Indigenous Norse zero-point subtext structuring today's Catholic liturgy, the paper constructs ancestral primacy as the delinking methodology for indigeniztion; (2) By emphasizing ritual as transformative technology for identity and relationship, in its wielding of neurolinguistic programming, the paper establishes indigenous epistemology as the proper spatial locus for any symbolic exchange that emerges authentic sacramental ethics; (3) By discussing the possibilities that creating indigenous Divinity graduate schools in African countries offers, a path of realizing sociopolitical stability and harmony in African states as a communal body is systematized.

With the ritual of eating pods, the pigs grow full and fat while the human, in the divine image and likeness, lives depraved, poor, abandoned, humiliated, and trapped in an ideology of unworthiness. The sub-Saharan African performance of inculturated Catholic liturgies is wanting, in producing the public work of social transformation into life-to-the-full. This parable's solution is self-evaluation for delinking from master-generated identities to undertake ancestral primacy. To "arise and return to the father" is the path of renewed identity and communal relationship where the new ritual of eating the fattened calf restores access to the life-giving force of the Father's knowledge, ancestry, wealth and spirituality. With indigenous divinity graduate schools, African theology will retrieve the epistemologies required to reawaken and reset the African mind to the path home. This paper includes the scholarly contributions of Elochukwu Uzukwu, James Okoye, Oyeronke Oyewumi, Patricia HIll Collins, Louis-Marie Chauvet, Dilts and Delozier among others.

School

McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts

Advisor

Elizabeth Cochran

Submission Type

Paper

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"Returning to My Father" : A Decolonial Reading of Lk 15:11-32 Towards a Reconstruction of African Theological Anthropology for Authentic Sacramental Ethics via Indigenous Divinity Graduate Schools.

This paper makes three hermeneutical contributions: (1) By uncovering the Indigenous Norse zero-point subtext structuring today's Catholic liturgy, the paper constructs ancestral primacy as the delinking methodology for indigeniztion; (2) By emphasizing ritual as transformative technology for identity and relationship, in its wielding of neurolinguistic programming, the paper establishes indigenous epistemology as the proper spatial locus for any symbolic exchange that emerges authentic sacramental ethics; (3) By discussing the possibilities that creating indigenous Divinity graduate schools in African countries offers, a path of realizing sociopolitical stability and harmony in African states as a communal body is systematized.

With the ritual of eating pods, the pigs grow full and fat while the human, in the divine image and likeness, lives depraved, poor, abandoned, humiliated, and trapped in an ideology of unworthiness. The sub-Saharan African performance of inculturated Catholic liturgies is wanting, in producing the public work of social transformation into life-to-the-full. This parable's solution is self-evaluation for delinking from master-generated identities to undertake ancestral primacy. To "arise and return to the father" is the path of renewed identity and communal relationship where the new ritual of eating the fattened calf restores access to the life-giving force of the Father's knowledge, ancestry, wealth and spirituality. With indigenous divinity graduate schools, African theology will retrieve the epistemologies required to reawaken and reset the African mind to the path home. This paper includes the scholarly contributions of Elochukwu Uzukwu, James Okoye, Oyeronke Oyewumi, Patricia HIll Collins, Louis-Marie Chauvet, Dilts and Delozier among others.