Presenter Information

Juanita Leal

MM Vocal Performance, Mary Pappert School of Music, Duquesne University

BA Voice Performance, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana

Abstract

Studies in vocal performance have suggested the interdependence of cognitive reactions and performative proprioception. This interdependence indicates an introspective self-evaluation process during the act of musical performance. When affected by singers’ judgment of vocal production, self-evaluation and perceptive processes potentially change due to implicit competitive roles in the music performance environment.

In this project, I delve deeper into the ways the brain recognizes aspects of vocal sounds, how it reacts to the process of singing, and how it can identify them as its own In two different environments: the controlled practice space and the variable performance space. By reflecting on existing research and conducting a series of interviews with college voice students, I aim to understand how they perceive their voices during the act of vocal performance and whether they notice a change in said perception while they think they are being judged. In the end, I will compare the results of my interviews with the literature reviewed to determine whether perceptual aspects of singing map onto the results that researchers have found.

School

Mary Pappert School of Music

Advisor

Zvonimir Nagy

Submission Type

Paper

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Cognitive insights and implications of singing: actions, proprioception, and perception in vocal performance.

Studies in vocal performance have suggested the interdependence of cognitive reactions and performative proprioception. This interdependence indicates an introspective self-evaluation process during the act of musical performance. When affected by singers’ judgment of vocal production, self-evaluation and perceptive processes potentially change due to implicit competitive roles in the music performance environment.

In this project, I delve deeper into the ways the brain recognizes aspects of vocal sounds, how it reacts to the process of singing, and how it can identify them as its own In two different environments: the controlled practice space and the variable performance space. By reflecting on existing research and conducting a series of interviews with college voice students, I aim to understand how they perceive their voices during the act of vocal performance and whether they notice a change in said perception while they think they are being judged. In the end, I will compare the results of my interviews with the literature reviewed to determine whether perceptual aspects of singing map onto the results that researchers have found.