Presenter Information

Kathleen Dawson, PharmD Candidate 2020, School of Pharmacy

Choniece Phillips, PharmD Candidate 2020, School of Pharmacy

Lindsay Roberts, PharmD Candidate 2020, School of Pharmacy

Megan Bookser, PharmD

Jamie McConaha, PharmD, School of Pharmacy

Abstract

Abstract

Objective

The focus of this study was to evaluate the impact of pharmacist’ intervention on quality metrics focusing on patients with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus type II (T2DM) not currently prescribed statin therapy.

Methods

This retrospective cohort investigational study was conducted in four lowest performing office locations of a nineteen regional primary care physician group practice. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis of T2DM without active statin therapy. Data was excluded from analysis for patients younger than age 40 or older than age 75, or if the most recent LDL documented was less than 70 mg/dL. Recommendations for initiation of statin therapy were sent electronically to the patient’s primary care physician via EMR software.

Results

Preliminary screening in March 2018 demonstrated a total of 2206 patients diagnosed with T2DM, for which 790 patients were not actively prescribed statin therapy. 468 patients were identified as eligible for statin therapy. Endpoint analysis in November 2018 showed that of the initial 468 patients who were eligible for a statin, 74 had been prescribed a statin, and 23 patients fell out of study criteria.

Implications

The efficacy of statin interventions is supported by the practice entity’s improvement in STAR ratings for the Medicare Advantage populations, in which two major payer groups saw increases in statin use in diabetes measures. Standard of care combined with pharmacist-led interventions correlated to a 4-STAR rating for the practice entity as of October 2018. Pharmacists can play an important role in helping physicians meet these quality metrics.

School

School of Pharmacy

Advisor

Dr. Jamie McConaha; Dr. Megan Bookser

Submission Type

Paper

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Improving Physician Office Quality Measures by Evaluating Statin Prescribing in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

Abstract

Objective

The focus of this study was to evaluate the impact of pharmacist’ intervention on quality metrics focusing on patients with a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus type II (T2DM) not currently prescribed statin therapy.

Methods

This retrospective cohort investigational study was conducted in four lowest performing office locations of a nineteen regional primary care physician group practice. Inclusion criteria were diagnosis of T2DM without active statin therapy. Data was excluded from analysis for patients younger than age 40 or older than age 75, or if the most recent LDL documented was less than 70 mg/dL. Recommendations for initiation of statin therapy were sent electronically to the patient’s primary care physician via EMR software.

Results

Preliminary screening in March 2018 demonstrated a total of 2206 patients diagnosed with T2DM, for which 790 patients were not actively prescribed statin therapy. 468 patients were identified as eligible for statin therapy. Endpoint analysis in November 2018 showed that of the initial 468 patients who were eligible for a statin, 74 had been prescribed a statin, and 23 patients fell out of study criteria.

Implications

The efficacy of statin interventions is supported by the practice entity’s improvement in STAR ratings for the Medicare Advantage populations, in which two major payer groups saw increases in statin use in diabetes measures. Standard of care combined with pharmacist-led interventions correlated to a 4-STAR rating for the practice entity as of October 2018. Pharmacists can play an important role in helping physicians meet these quality metrics.

 

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