Title

Worker Commitment: A Comparison Study of American and Japanese Organizations in Thailand

Author

Chongyi Wei

Defense Date

11-27-2007

Graduation Date

Spring 1-1-2008

Availability

Campus Only

Submission Type

thesis

Degree Name

MA

Department

Graduate Center for Social and Public Policy

School

McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts

Committee Chair

Joseph D. Yenerall

Committee Member

Michael Irwin

Keywords

commitment, developing countries, employee

Abstract

This study investigates organizational structures and practices that may elicit worker's commitment in a developing country--Thailand. In addition, significant predictors of commitment are compared between American and Japanese transplants.

Lincoln and Kalleberg (1990)'s "welfare corporatist theory" is adopted as the theoretical framework for this study. Their theory identifies four categories of organizational structures and practices that are believed to enhance worker's commitment. Each of those four categories is examined using a range of indicators.

The data used this study was gathered by Harold R. Kerbo and his collaborators by distributing self-administered questionnaires to approximately 1,000 employees in 24 American and Japanese organizations in Thailand.

The findings suggest that some organizational structures and practices affect worker commitment in both American and Japanese organizations while others are unique to each type. The model presented by Lincoln and kalleberg to explain commitment in modern corporatist nations is a general model that explains these employee orientations just as well in developing non-corporatist nations.

Format

PDF

Language

English

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