Author

J. Douglass

Defense Date

11-14-2007

Graduation Date

2007

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

dissertation

Degree Name

PhD

Department

Theology

School

McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts

Committee Chair

Michael Slusser

Committee Member

Bogdan Bucur

Committee Member

Radu Bordeianu

Keywords

Alexandria, early Christianity, resurrection

Abstract

The doctrine of bodily resurrection is fundamental to the Christian faith. Its significance is grounded in the fact that the Christian faith arises from and is dependent upon the belief that Jesus returned to life after having been dead and buried. As a result of this belief and the teaching of Christ's first followers, the early Church articulated a hope for a similar resurrection. In spite of the centrality of the doctrine of bodily resurrection for the early Church, the doctrine's present relevance is questionable. This dissertation provides an answer to the question, What does it mean to affirm faith in bodily resurrection? Through its response, this study also demonstrates that the doctrine of bodily resurrection can be articulated in a way that is meaningful to contemporary Christian faith.

This study explores the various expressions of faith in resurrection from Ante-Nicene

Alexandria. After the examination of these ancient testimonies, three more recent interpretations of the doctrine are considered. They are found in the explanations of the Apostles' Creed provided by Joseph Ratzinger (now Pope Benedict XVI), Wolfhart Pannenberg, and Hans Urs von Balthasar. The dissertation concludes with an articulation of the doctrine of bodily

resurrection intended for an audience who does not view the epistemological foundations of

previous generations as valid.

Format

PDF

Language

English

Share

COinS