Defense Date

11-9-2009

Graduation Date

2009

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

dissertation

Degree Name

PhD

Department

Theology

School

McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts

Committee Chair

Marie Baird

Committee Member

George Worgul

Committee Member

Sean Kealy

Keywords

Africa, African Catholic Church, Catholic Church, Inculturated Theology, inculturation, theological anthropology

Abstract

This dissertation critically examines the foundational significance of Christ for contextual theologies in the African Catholic Church. It begins with a presentation of Benezet Bujo's approach and contextual methodology. As a critical study, this dissertation is premised on the principle that the object of Christianity is the transformation of peoples and their societies. Therefore, the study examines the ways in which African societies founded on an immutable principle of blood kinship can open to the Christian faith and to the globalizing world today. The dissertation grapples with this issue to unravel the weaknesses and limitations of African theologies of inculturation. The paper argues on the basis of empirical evidence and Vatican Council II teaching, and in view of a sound inculturation, that the primary root of the present cultural and human crisis on the African Continent is rooted in the diverse anthropologies and ontologies. The paper, in turn, appeals to theological anthropology in contemporary Catholic theological thought to discern the essential working principles and practical guidelines for contextual theological methodology. A major principle in this quest for a sound methodology is the meaning of Jesus of Nazareth for humanity in diversely constituted cultural settings. Having recognized Christology as a theological and anthropological principle, the dissertation brings out the Christian significance of the (traditional) Western social system for diverse cultures in Africa.

Format

PDF

Language

English

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