Presenter Information

Francesca Ezeokonkwo, MSN, RN, Rick Zoucha, PhD, PMHCNS-BC, CTN-A, FAAN, Kathleen Sekula, PhD, PMHCNS, FAAN

Duquesne University School of Nursing

Abstract

Title: Understanding the Meaning of Well-being in Older Adults: A Mini-phenomenology

Background and Objective: Loneliness is a major concern in older adults, the fastest-growing segment of society, due to age-related losses. As the aging population continues to rise, so will their vulnerability to loneliness. Previous studies suggest that promoting well-being is a potential strategy to prevent or reduce loneliness. The aim of this mini-study was to explore the meaning of well-being in older adults.

Methods: A qualitative descriptive mini-phenomenological research design was utilized for this study. Four older adults ages 72 to 78 (mean age of 74.3) participated in the mini-study. Data was collected through audiotaped, open-ended face-to-face interviews, field notes, and observations. Giorgi's (2012) methodology for data analyses was used to analyze the data. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and entered into NVivo 12 data analysis software. Codes were created from the data and merged into categories. The categories led to the formation of descriptive themes.

Results: Three initial major themes emerged for the meaning of well-being: (1) Living a healthy and fulfilled life, (2) Being involved with family and friends, and (3) Having a relationship with God.

Conclusions and Implications: The findings have significance for the holistic care of older adults and generate insights into the areas where nurses and those working with older adults should focus while developing interventions to promote well-being. This mini-study provides a basis for the feasibility of conducting a larger study.

School

School of Nursing

Advisor

Dr. Kathleen Sekula

Submission Type

Paper

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Understanding the Meaning of Well-being in Older Adults: A Mini-phenomenology

Title: Understanding the Meaning of Well-being in Older Adults: A Mini-phenomenology

Background and Objective: Loneliness is a major concern in older adults, the fastest-growing segment of society, due to age-related losses. As the aging population continues to rise, so will their vulnerability to loneliness. Previous studies suggest that promoting well-being is a potential strategy to prevent or reduce loneliness. The aim of this mini-study was to explore the meaning of well-being in older adults.

Methods: A qualitative descriptive mini-phenomenological research design was utilized for this study. Four older adults ages 72 to 78 (mean age of 74.3) participated in the mini-study. Data was collected through audiotaped, open-ended face-to-face interviews, field notes, and observations. Giorgi's (2012) methodology for data analyses was used to analyze the data. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and entered into NVivo 12 data analysis software. Codes were created from the data and merged into categories. The categories led to the formation of descriptive themes.

Results: Three initial major themes emerged for the meaning of well-being: (1) Living a healthy and fulfilled life, (2) Being involved with family and friends, and (3) Having a relationship with God.

Conclusions and Implications: The findings have significance for the holistic care of older adults and generate insights into the areas where nurses and those working with older adults should focus while developing interventions to promote well-being. This mini-study provides a basis for the feasibility of conducting a larger study.