Presenter Information

Olajumoke E. Oshokoya M.A.Ed., Cliff G. Oliech, M.S.Ed., JoVonne M. Tabb, M.S.Ed., Mary P. Comis, M.S.Ed., Temple S. Lovelace, Ph.D., BCBA-D

Department of Counseling, Psychology and Special Education

Abstract

Most research on Black girls seem to have focused more on their behaviors (Morris, 2007), when compared to their White peers. It is even worse for Black Girls with Disabilities (BGDs) who have continued to be academically marginalized at the intersection of race, gender, and disability. Given the long history of special education research on improving the academic achievement of students with disabilities and the sustained representation of Black children receiving special education services across United States’ K-12 schools (Skiba et al., 2005), it becomes critical to systematically scope the academic interventions that have been used to improve the academic skills of BGDs. Using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis Extension for Scoping Reviews (PRISMA-ScR) checklist (Tricco et al., 2018) and Askey and O’Malley’s (2005) framework, the authors found nine academic interventions that were used to improve the academic skills of BGDs across the 15 studies. Repeated reading interventions (RRIs) delivered through computer assisted instruction (CAI) were shown as an effective intervention at improving the academic skills of BGDs. With a narrative synthesis, themes on current gaps across the studies reviewed are discussed in addition to the systemic reasons why greater attention is needed on evidence-based practices that specifically address improving the academic skills of BGDs. Limitations and recommendations for future research are also discussed.

Keywords: academic skills, Black girls with disabilities, interventions, intersectionality, scoping review

School

School of Education

Advisor

Dr. Temple S. Lovelace, BCBA-D

Submission Type

Paper

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Unpacking the Academic Interventions for Improving the Academic Skills of Black Girls with Disabilities: A Scoping Review

Most research on Black girls seem to have focused more on their behaviors (Morris, 2007), when compared to their White peers. It is even worse for Black Girls with Disabilities (BGDs) who have continued to be academically marginalized at the intersection of race, gender, and disability. Given the long history of special education research on improving the academic achievement of students with disabilities and the sustained representation of Black children receiving special education services across United States’ K-12 schools (Skiba et al., 2005), it becomes critical to systematically scope the academic interventions that have been used to improve the academic skills of BGDs. Using the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis Extension for Scoping Reviews (PRISMA-ScR) checklist (Tricco et al., 2018) and Askey and O’Malley’s (2005) framework, the authors found nine academic interventions that were used to improve the academic skills of BGDs across the 15 studies. Repeated reading interventions (RRIs) delivered through computer assisted instruction (CAI) were shown as an effective intervention at improving the academic skills of BGDs. With a narrative synthesis, themes on current gaps across the studies reviewed are discussed in addition to the systemic reasons why greater attention is needed on evidence-based practices that specifically address improving the academic skills of BGDs. Limitations and recommendations for future research are also discussed.

Keywords: academic skills, Black girls with disabilities, interventions, intersectionality, scoping review